Supreme Court’s Scary Power Grab

May 24, 2011 @

The U.S. Supreme Court effectively ordered California on Monday to release 33,000 inmates over two years from an in-state prison population that numbers about 143,000.

Kent Scheidegger of the tough-on-crime Criminal Justice Legal Foundation blogged that Californians shouldn’t “bother investing much in a car. It will be open season on cars, given that car thieves (nonviolent offenders) will never go to prison no matter how many times they are caught.”

The 5-4 Plata decision upheld a federal three-judge panel that in 2009 found that overcrowding in California prisons is “criminogenic” — likely to produce criminals — and ordered state prisons to run at 137.5 percent of design capacity. The state’s prisons are designed to hold 80,000 inmates. (Be it noted, 100 percent capacity means one inmate per cell.)

Writing for the majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy cited ugly stories of inmates waiting months for needed medical and mental-health treatment — a violation of Eighth Amendment protections against cruel and unusual punishment. And: “As many as 54 prisoners may share a single toilet.” Kennedy argued, “Prisoners retain the essence of human dignity inherent in all persons.”

Corrections head Matthew Cate chided the Big Bench for ignoring the many improvements in the system over the past five years. For example, the state has removed some 13,000 out of 20,000 nontraditional or “bad beds” — think large rooms stuffed with bunk beds to warehouse unprocessed inmates. (I don’t think Kennedy liked those beds — he included two photos of them with his opinion.)

In his dissenting opinion, Justice Samuel Alito noted that the three-judge panel relied on old statistics and ignored more current (and favorable) data, such as the huge drop in “likely preventable deaths” from 18 in 2006 to 3 in 2007.

Read More at Real Clear Politics By Debra Saunders, Real Clear Politics

 

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